7 Responses to “Keane Wide Eyed Polar Bear Plate”

  1. Allee Willis

    Allee Willis

    Wow, I didn’t even know Keane did things like this! Do you know what year was this done? And didn’t you say on the AWMoK Facebook page that this was signed? This is a very keen Keane.

  2. Avatar

    Kalika

    This is an numbered edition,5222 from the Franklin Mint.
    Called PU’s Polar Playground, well, the signature is on the plate.
    Part of Gentle Kingdom Plate Collection.
    I think maybe you didn’t get my full submission- I had 3 other pics- cu front & back.
    As I mentioned, I didn’t appreciate the Keane Kitch in the 60’s, when they were named the artists of the NY Worlds Fair, and painted what looked like thousands of wide eyed waifs in international clothing.

    • Allee Willis

      Allee Willis

      Definitely didn’t see the other photos you mention. This was the only one that was in the post. Any way you can email them to me at allee@awmok.com and I’ll insert them in the post for you?

      Interesting to hear there’s a whole Gentle Kingdom plate collection. I didn’t even know that animals were in the Keane stable.

      I would have killed to see that New York World’s Fair collection with the waifs in international clothing.

  3. windupkitty

    windupkitty

    this is the type of keane stuff i grew up with.that and her prints and of course, dolls.my mom and one of her sisters were obsessed with the dolls……i always liked that keane usually had animals in her paintings.at least tones in my aunts house did……they were later, form the 80s i think…………

  4. Avatar

    Kalika

    I collect all sorts of oddities, but not generally kitch. However, some people would lump this together…another collectible plate from the Franklin Mint, 1969 for the Boy Scouts. Norman Rockwell painting , with a number of boy scouts looking on. numbered, signed in the plate.

    • Allee Willis

      Allee Willis

      Norman Rockwell is a little straighter than the Kitsch honored here at AWMoK but it definitely has Kitsch aspects to it in that he tapped right into the center of pop culture and captured the times in a way no one else ever had.